A project to build the world’s longest subsea power cable has been given the green light after Britain’s National Grid and Denmark’s Energinet awarded contracts to Prysmian and NKT worth up to 1.1bn euros.

A project to build the world’s longest subsea power cable has been given the green light after Britain’s National Grid and Denmark’s Energinet awarded contracts to Prysmian and NKT worth up to 1.1bn euros.

Italy's Prysmian and Sweden's NKT will manufacture the 1.4GW parallel high voltage current cables, while Germany’s Siemens will supply two converter stations.

The Viking Link between Britain and Denmark will help the two nations diversify power supplies and give energy suppliers more opportunities to sell surplus power.

Jon Butterworth, chief operating officer for National Grid Ventures, said: "Viking Link will play a vital role in helping to decarbonise the UK's power supply."

The HVDC cable system will link converter stations in Lincolnshire, UK, to Revsing, Denmark, with 777 miles worth of submarine cable and 84 miles of land cables on the UK side.

Developers have set a date at the end of 2023 for commissioning. Cables will be manufactured at Prysmian’s facility in Arco Felice, Italy.